Children & Young People

Some children’s behaviour can be upsetting and a concern for parents. By providing counselling for children and young people, I can help to provide a safe supportive space for your child to explore the things they are finding a struggle. And work with them to find their voice and express themselves. Counselling can be a empowering way to provide a child the space to grow in confidence and self esteem, leading to better relationships  and emotional wellbeing, leading to success in life.

Children are encouraged to explore choices and decisions that could lead to effective functioning and improved outcomes. With the help of counselling, children and young people can be supported in challenging personal issues and crises that could interrupt their learning, self-esteem and social development.

Counselling for children

Examples of issues I can help with:

  • Anger issues
  • Parental separation
  • Bullying (cyber)
  • Self-harm
  • Stress & Anxiety
  • Self-esteem
  • Substance misuse
  • Sibling rivalry
  • Education stress
  • Indentity issues

Counselling for Children – Questions parents ask

WHAT IF MY CHILD SAYS PRIVATE THINGS ABOUT MY FAMILY?

It is important that your child/ren feel safe and free to talk about their experiences in the family setting that may be troubling or confusing for them. I will always work with empathy and compassion and without being judgmental. It matters that you give approval to your child/ren to talk to the counsellor. It is understandable you might feel worried about what your child may wish to talk about in counselling. However, you should bear in mind that the strict code of ethics counsellors follow includes clauses about confidentiality.

I am not there to judge you or anyone else in your family, my sole purpose is to help your child/ren manage their problems and try to resolve them in a positive way.

CAN I ASK MY CHILD QUESTIONS ABOUT THE COUNSELLING SESSIONS?

The counselling relationship is very private and personal, and each child will respond differently. Some children may wish to talk to their parents about sessions, while others, especially teenagers, may wish to keep the content of the sessions to themselves. It is important to be guided by your child and to respect these individual differences. There may be times when your child seems more upset following a counselling session, and this may be because they have been talking about painful feelings. Showing sensitivity to their distress, while also respecting their right to privacy, is a difficult but important balance for parents to achieve.

AS A PARENT/CARER CAN I ASK YOU HOW THE SESSIONS ARE GOING?

It is natural that you will want to know how your child is getting on in their counselling. Some counsellors may arrange to meet with you to review progress. They will only do this with your child’s consent and knowledge of what is to be discussed. It is important to remember that I will have agreed to a confidential relationship with your child and have a duty to hold this.

The only very rare exception to this would be if I thought your child was at serious risk of harming themselves or others or they specifically asked me to let you know something. I would always work to empower your child to talk to you themselves in the first instance.

HOW MANY SESSIONS WILL MY CHILD NEED?

The amount of sessions is usually discussed with you during the assessment (first session) and can be extended or decreased at anytime. I generally work for short fixed-term periods such as six or 12 weeks, and can flexibly  extend or decrease the session considering what is best for the wellbeing of the child/ren.

What next?

Depending on your child’s age, I will work with you and your child to see if there is cause to extend our work together or refer on to another counsellor or support service.

I have close links with many children and young people’s services and youth organisations and can offer a suggestions for you to consider.

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